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Vadītājs
Māra Grīnfelde

Study Course Description

Course Description Statuss:Under Review
Course Description Version:1.00
Study Course Accepted:06.04.2018
Study Course Information
Course Code:HZK_004LQF level:Level 6
Credit Points:2.00ECTS:3.00
Branch of Science:PsychologyTarget Audience:Medicine
Study Course Supervisor
Course Supervisor:Māra Grīnfelde
Study Course Implementer
Structural Unit:Department of Humanities
The Head of Structural Unit:Vija Sīle
Contacts:Rīga, Dzirciema iela 16, hzkatrsu[pnkts]lv, hzkatrsu[pnkts]lv, +371 67409104
Study Course Planning
Full-Time - 1. Semester No.
Lectures (number)6Lecture Length (academic hours)2Total Contact Hours of Lectures12
Classes (number)10Class Length (academic hours)2Total Contact Hours of Classes20
Total Contact Hours32
Study course description
Preliminary Knowledge:
Basic knowledge of general psychology.
Objective:
The course introduces students to the main personality theories of the 20th century. The objectives of the course are to form an understanding of the main personality theories and to develop students’ ability to analyze and discuss main concepts used in these theories.
Topic Layout (Full-Time)
No.TopicType of ImplementationNumberVenue
1Personality Psychology: An IntroductionLectures1.00auditorium
2Cervone D., Pervin L. A. Personality Theory: From Everyday Observations to Systematic TheoriesClasses1.00auditorium
3Biheviorism and Learning Approaches to Personality. Richard S. Sharf. Depression: Jane and Phobic Disorder: Six-year-old-girlClasses1.00auditorium
4Freud’s Psychoanalytic Theory of PersonalityLectures1.00auditorium
5Jung’s Analytic PsychologyLectures1.00auditorium
6Adler’s Individual PsychologyLectures1.00auditorium
7Relational Approaches to Personality: HorneyLectures1.00auditorium
8Trait Theories of Personality: AllportLectures1.00auditorium
9Biological Foundations of Personality: Evolutionary PsychologyLectures1.00auditorium
10Phenomenological Theory: Carl Rodgers’s Person-Centered Theory of PersonalityLectures1.00auditorium
11Biheviorism and Learning Approaches to PersonalityLectures1.00auditorium
12Cognitive Theories of PersonalityLectures1.00auditorium
13Cervone D., Pervin L. A. Personality Theory: From Everyday Observations to Systematic TheoriesClasses1.00auditorium
14Psychoanalysis. A Case Example: Little HansClasses1.00auditorium
15Analytical Psychology. Barbara S. Sullivan. Christina (A Case Example)Classes1.00auditorium
16Individual Psychology. Richard S. Sharf. Depression: SheriClasses1.00auditorium
17Relational Approaches to Personality. Donna M. Ashcraft. Breaking Up is Hard to DoClasses1.00auditorium
18L. Barkhuus. Allport’s Theory of Traits: A Case StudyClasses1.00auditorium
19Evolutionary Psychology. D. Cervone and L. Pervin. Sex Differences: Evolutionary Origins?Classes1.00auditorium
20Phenomenological Theory. Carl Rogers: Ellen West – and LonelinessClasses1.00auditorium
21Biheviorism and Learning Approaches to Personality. Richard S. Sharf. Depression: Jane and Phobic Disorder: Six-year-old-girlClasses1.00auditorium
22Cognitive Theories of Personality. Richard S. Sharf. Obsessive Disorder: ElectricianClasses1.00auditorium
Assessment
Unaided Work:
Analysis of primary and secondary literature
Assessment Criteria:
Assessment criteria include quality work in seminar classes, one theoretical test and an examination.
Final Examination (Full-Time):Test
Final Examination (Part-Time):
Learning Outcomes
Knowledge:The student will be able to describe the main personality theories, to define the main concepts used in these theories, as well as compare and evaluate them.
Skills:The student will be able to summarize the relevant information about each personality theory; she will be able to choose the most appropriate theory in order to apply it to the individual cases and she will be able to appropriate concepts in order to describe personality.
Competencies:The student will be able to differentiate between different personality theories, to formulate and explain the main concepts used in these theories as well as evaluate them. She will also be able to argue for strong and weak points of personality theories.
Bibliography
No.Reference
1Reņģe V. (1999), „Personības psiholoģiskās teorijas”, Rīga: Zvaigzne ABC
2Reņģe V. (2000), „Personības psiholoģija”, Rīga: Zvaigzne ABC
3Karpova, Ā. (1998), „Personība. Teorijas un to radītāji.”, Rīga: Zvaigzne ABC
4Freids, Z.(2010) „Ievadlekcijas psihoanalīzē”.
1Ewen, R.B. (2003)„An Introduction to Theories of Personality”. (4th Edition), Taylor & Francis Group
2Cloninger, S. (2003)„Theories of Personality: Understanding Persons (4th Edition), New Jersey: Prentice Hall
3Feist J., Feist, G. (2006) „Theories of Personality”, (6th Edition), Boston: McGraw-Hill
1RSU bibliotēkas materiāli