Skip to main content

Mass Communication Theories

Study Course Description

Course Description Statuss:Approved
Course Description Version:4.00
Study Course Accepted:26.10.2020
Study Course Information
Course Code:KSK_259LQF level:Level 6
Credit Points:2.00ECTS:3.00
Branch of Science:Communication SciencesTarget Audience:Communication Science
Study Course Supervisor
Course Supervisor:Ilva Skulte
Study Course Implementer
Structural Unit:Faculty of Communication
The Head of Structural Unit:Anda Rožukalne
Contacts:Riga, 16 Dzirciema Street, kfkoatrsu[pnkts]lv, +371 67409183
Study Course Planning
Full-Time - Semester No.1
Lectures (count)8Lecture Length (academic hours)2Total Contact Hours of Lectures16
Classes (count)4Class Length (academic hours)2Total Contact Hours of Classes8
Total Contact Hours24
Part-Time - Semester No.1
Lectures (count)5Lecture Length (academic hours)2Total Contact Hours of Lectures10
Classes (count)3Class Length (academic hours)2Total Contact Hours of Classes6
Total Contact Hours16
Study course description
Preliminary Knowledge:
Introduction to communication theories.
Objective:
To provide a summary overview of the most important mass communication problems and theoretical approaches to their explanation, as well as possibilities offered by them in interpretation of the most important matters of journalism and multimedia communication and in the analysis of public relations.
Topic Layout (Full-Time)
No.TopicType of ImplementationNumberVenue
1Introduction to mass communication theory. What is mass? Historical origins of mass communication theories.Lectures2.00auditorium
2Media and society. Policy.Lectures2.00auditorium
3Media and society. Diversity and media.Classes1.00auditorium
4Organisation of media work. Formats, genres. Elements of the media system.Lectures1.00auditorium
5Regulatory theories.Classes1.00auditorium
6Media and culture.Lectures3.00auditorium
7Mass communication: prospects of new media and networks.Classes1.00auditorium
8Modern problems of mass communication. Presentation of final papers.Classes1.00auditorium
Topic Layout (Part-Time)
No.TopicType of ImplementationNumberVenue
1Introduction to mass communication theory. What is mass? Historical origins of mass communication theories.Lectures1.00auditorium
2Media and society. Policy.Lectures1.00auditorium
3Media and society. Diversity and media.Classes1.00auditorium
4Organisation of media work. Formats, genres. Elements of the media system.Lectures1.00auditorium
5Regulatory theories.Classes1.00auditorium
6Media and culture.Lectures2.00auditorium
8Modern problems of mass communication. Presentation of final papers.Classes1.00auditorium
Assessment
Unaided Work:
To read scientific articles on mass communication, society, culture from the point of view of different theories. To understand the specifics of each approach. To prepare the following questions: • What topics are discussed in the article? • What area of mass communication do the authors explain? • What can you learn from it? • How do theoretical considerations of the article fit into the context of mass communication theories? • What methods are used for data acquisition to justify theoretical considerations? To create an analysis on any of topical matters of mass communication. To write an essay and to present it to study peers.
Assessment Criteria:
Participation in lectures and discussions, analysis of theoretical texts, tests, essay and presentation.
Final Examination (Full-Time):Exam
Final Examination (Part-Time):Exam
Learning Outcomes
Knowledge:Students can name and explain main theoretical approaches and topical matters in the field of mass communication, society and culture, and to build a foundation for the analysis within an independent research in the area of journalism, public relations or multimedia communication.
Skills:Students are ready: • to identify and analyse processes and problems in different fields of mass communication and in different aspects – use, content of media organisations and systems, audiences and media, impact of media on society and culture; • to create messages and analytical works for public communication, taking into account the specifics of mass audience and mass communication; • to create a conceptual theoretical design for the Bachelor’s thesis.
Competencies:Students are able to use their knowledge in the field of mass communication to develop independent research in journalism, public relations and multimedia communication in practice based on an accurately selected theoretical perspective with its conceptual and methodological apparatus.
Bibliography
No.Reference
Required Reading
1Curran, J., Gurevitch M (ed.). Mass Media and Society. – London: Arnold – Hodder Headlines Group, 2.ed., 1997
2Hall, S. Encoding/Decoding.//Culture, Media, Language. (ed.by Hall, S.Hobson, D., Lowe, A., Willis, P.) 2nd.ed. – London: Routledge, 1992.
3McQuail, D. McQuail's mass communication theory. – London:SAGE Publications, 2010.
4McQuail, D., & Windahl, S. Communication models for the study of mass communications. Routledge. 2015
5Jensen, K.B. Rosengren K.E. Five Traditions in Search of the Audience. Mass Communication. Ed.by McQuail, D. – London, Sage, 2006., IV., pp. 171 – 190
6McCombs. M., Shaw, D. The Agenda- Setting Function of Mass Media. //Mass Communication. Ed.by McQuail, D. – London: Sage, 2006., IV., PP. 248 – 258
7Noelle – Neuman, e. The Theory OF Public Opinion: The Concept OF Spiral of Silence. //Mass Communication. Ed.by McQuail, D. – London, Sage, 2006., IV., pp. 271 – 302.
8Street J. Mass Media, Politics and Democracy. – Basingstone, New York: Palgrave, 2001.
9Banks, J., Humphreys, S. The Labour of User Co-Creators : Emergent Social Network Markets?// Convergence, 2008, nr. 14: pp.401-418.
10Rožukalne, A. Kam pieder Latvijas mediji?: Monogrāfija par Latvijas mediju sistēmu un ietekmīgākajiem mediju īpašniekiem. Rīga: Zinātne. 2013
11DeFleur, M. L., & DeFleur, M. H. Mass communication theories: Explaining origins, processes, and effects. Routledge. 2016
12Wei, R. (Ed.). Advances in Foundational Mass Communication Theories. Routledge, 2018.
13Hanson, R. E. Mass communication: Living in a media world. Sage Publications. 2016
14Curran, J., & Hesmondhalgh, D. Media and Society. Bloomsbury Academic, 2019
Additional Reading
1O’Sullivan, P. B., & Carr, C. T. Masspersonal communication: A model bridging the mass-interpersonal divide. New Media & Society, (2018). 20(3), 1161-1180.
2Hoffner, C., Plotkin R.S., Buchanan, M., Anderson J.D., Kamigaki S.K., Hubbs, L.A., Kowalczyk, Z., Silberg, K., Pastorek. A. The Third-Person Effect in Perception of the Influence of Television Violence.//Journal of Communication, Vol.51, No2, June 2001 pp. 283-296
3McOmber, J. Technological Autonomy and Three Definitions of Technology. //Journal of Communication, Vol.49, No 3, Summer, 1999
4Castells, M. A Network Theory of Power. - International Journal of Communication, Nr. 5 (2011), pp. 773–787
5Ross. P. Is there an expertise of production? The case of new media producers.// New Media & Society. - September, 2011, no 13, pp. 912-928
6Dahlberg, L. Re-constructing digital democracy: An outline of four ‘positions’. //New Media & Society. September, 2011, no 13, pp. 855-872
7Liu, W., Sidhu, A., Beacom, A. M., & Valente, T. W. Social network theory. The international encyclopedia of media effects, 2017,1-12.
8Couldry, N., & Yu, J. Deconstructing datafication’s brave new world. New Media & Society, 2018, 20(12), 4473-4491.
9Chandler, D. Marxist Media Theory.
10Couldry, N. Media, society, world: Social theory and digital media practice. Polity. 2012
11Chandler, D. An Introduction to Genre Theory.
12Couldry, N., Livingstone, S., & Markham, T. (2016). Media consumption and public engagement: Beyond the presumption of attention. Springer.
13Castells, M. Networks of outrage and hope: Social movements in the Internet age. John Wiley & Sons. 2015
14Andrews, Jim. McLuhan Reconsidered. URL: http://vispo.com/writings/essays/mcluhana.htm
15Kerckhove, D.de. McLuhan and the Toronto School of Communication. -
16Livingstone, S., Mascheroni, G., & Staksrud, E. European research on children’s internet use: Assessing the past and anticipating the future. New Media & Society, 2018, 20(3), 1103-1122.
17Federman M. The Cultural Paradox of the Global Village
18Ījābs, I. Argumentācija un manipulācija politiskajā komunikācijā: diskursa teorijas perspektīva. // Politiskā komunikācija ētika un kultūra Latvijas Republikas 9.Saeimas vēlēšanās. – Rīga, LU 2007., 164. – 186.lpp.
19Juzefovičs, J. Sociālo priekšstatu veidošanās: politisko ziņojumu lietojums un interpretācija pirms 9. Saeimas vēlēšanām. // Politiskā komunikācija ētika un kultūra Latvijas Republikas 9.Saeimas vēlēšanās. – Rīga, LU 2007. 267 – 279.lpp.
20Šulmane, I. Kurš uzraudzīs sargsuni: nacionālo dienas laikrakstu žurnālistu attieksme pret profesionālo ētiku Saeimas vēlēšanu kontekstā. //// Politiskā komunikācija ētika un kultūra Latvijas Republikas 9.Saeimas vēlēšanās. – Rīga, LU 2007., 207 .– 224.lpp.
21Tunne, I. Zelče, V. Simboli un rituāli 9.Saeimas priekšvēlēšanu kampaņā. // Politiskā komunikācija ētika un kultūra Latvijas Republikas 9.Saeimas vēlēšanās. – Rīga, LU 2007., 113. – 131.lpp.
22Storey, J. Cultural Studies and the Studies of Popular Culture. - Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1996.
23Rožukalne, A. Kas? Kur? Kāda? Mūsdienu mediju auditorija. Rīga: Biznesa augstskola TURĪBA, 2011.